A small percentage of women have a BRAC 1 or BRAC 2 gene that makes them genetically prone to breast cancer. However, studies show that breast cancer can more often be linked to low progesterone levels. The studies on the relationship between breast cancer and progesterone are legion.

Unfortunately, conventional medicine often fails to recognize this well documented relationship and often does not understand the difference between progesterone and progestin. Progestin is found in prempro and in most hormonal birth control pills. The science is clear as shown below:

J. Natl Cancer Inst 92 (4): 3280332, 2000: *Adding a progestin to estrogen markedly increases the risk of breast cancer 29% over baseline.

JAMA 2000;203: 485-491. *Progestins dramatically increase risk of breast cancer

8 times over baseline. Progesterone is not Provera! Progesterone is not a progestin nor does it possess the toxic side effects or same chemical structure. Do not assume they are the same molecule.

Am J Obstet Gyn, Jan 1999;180:42-48: The incidence of side effects on estrogen alone were reduced when natural progesterone was added.

  • *Psychological effects, bloating, edema, nausea were reduced with the addition of OMP
  • *Unexpected feeling of well being when progesterone was added to estrogen
  • *Progesterone improved well-being
  • *Provera did not improve well-being

Eur J Cancer Prev 2002 Oct; 11(5):481-8: Growth inhibition of human breast cancer cells by progesterone is due to P13-kinase/AKT pathway causing apoptosis of breast cancer cells. Progesterone was shown to inhibit proliferation of normal breast epithelial cells as well as breast cancer cells.

Full term pregnancy is the most effective natural protection against breast cancer.  Because the mammary gland is exposed to the highest physiological concentrations of hormones during full term pregnancy, it is these elevated levels of hormones that likely induce protection from mammary cancer

Eur J Cancer Prev 2002 Oct; 11(5):481-8. Progesterone was shown to inhibit proliferation of normal breast epithelial cells as well as breast cancer cells.

By: Mike Clark, Director of Education and Research, NBH Lifetime Health